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Cordoba Fighting Dog - Perro de pelea cordobés

Cordoba Fighting Dog - Perro de pelea cordobés


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The Cordoba Fighting Dog is an extinct breed of fighting dog. The Cordoba was a crossbreed of Alano EspañolMastiffBull TerrierBulldog, and Boxer.[1]. Its temperament includes being very fierce, very aggressive, strong, vigorous, and relentless (high stamina)[2]. A male would often kill the female during mating-


 


 

The Cordoba Fighting Dog originated in Córdoba, Argentina.[3] It was noted for its willingness to fight to the death, and its high pain tolerance.[4] In addition, many members of this breed died in the dog fighting pits, contributing to the breed's extinction.

The Cordoba was capable of hunting in a small pack of a male and female; otherwise it was likely to turn on its pack-mates.

The Dogo Argentino is directly derived from this breed.[3] In the 1920s, breeders developed the Dog by crossing the Cordoba Fighting Dog with other breeds such as the Great DaneGreat PyreneesBulldogBull Terrier and Dogue de Bordeaux.[1]

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Until the early part of the 19th century, the Bulldog was bred with great care in England for the purpose of baiting bulls. The Bulldog of that day was vastly different from our present-day bulldog. Pictures from as late as 1870 represent the Bulldog as agile and as standing straight on his legs-his front legs in particular. In some cases he was even possessed of a muzzle, and long rat tails were not uncommon. The Bulldog of that day, with the exception of the head, looked more like the present-day American Staffordshire Terrier than like the present-day Bulldog. Some writers contend it was the white English Terrier, or the Black-and-Tan Terrier, that was used as a cross with the Bulldog to perfect the Staffordshire Terrier. It seems easier to believe that any game terrier, such as the Fox Terrier of the early 1800s, was used in this cross, since some of the foremost authorities on dogs of that time state that the Black-and-Tan and the white English Terrier were none too game, but these same authorities go on to stress the gameness of the Fox Terrier. It is reasonable to believe that breeders who were attempting to perfect a dog that would combine the spirit and agility of the terrier with the courage and tenacity of the Bulldog, would not use a terrier that was not game. In analyzing the three above-mentioned terriers at that time, breeders find that there was not a great deal of difference in body conformation, the greatest differences being in color, aggressiveness, and spirit. In any event, it was the cross between the Bulldog and the terrier that resulted in the Staffordshire Terrier, which was originally called the Bull-and-Terrier Dog, Half and Half, and at times Pit Dog or Pit Builterrier. Later, it assumed the name in England of Staffordshire Bull Terrier. These dogs began to find their way into America as early as 1870 and became known as Pit Dog, Pit Bull Terrier, later American Bull Terrier, and still later as Yankee Terrier. In 1936, they were accepted for registration in the AKC Stud Book as Staffordshire Terriers. The name of the breed was revised effective Jan. 1, 1972, to American Staffordshire Terrier. Breeders in this country had developed a type which is heavier in weight than the Staffordshire Bull Terrier of England and the name change was to distinguish them as separate breeds. The American Staffordshire Terrier's standard allows a variance in weight, but it should be in proportion to size. The dog's chief requisites should be strength unusual for his size, soundness, balance, a strong powerful head, a well-muscled body, and courage that is proverbial. To clarify the confusion that may exist, even in the minds of dog fanciers, as to the difference between the American Staffordshire Terrier and the Bull Terrier, a comment on the latter may be helpful. The Bull Terrier was introduced by James Hinks of Birmingham, who had been experimenting for several years with the old bull-and-terrier dog, now known as Staffordshire. It is generally conceded that he used the Staffordshire, crossed with the white English Terrier, and some writers contend that a dash of Pointer and Dalmatian blood was also used to help perfect the all-white Bull Terrier.
training &TEMPERAMENT
The Am Staff is a people-oriented dog that thrives when he is made part of the family and given a job to do. Regular exercise and training are necessary. They are natural clowns, so they tend to make training comical at times; they like to put a little twist on your training program. It’s vital to keep it fun and interesting. A stubborn-streak can make them difficult to train at times and will require patience and a firm, but kind, hand.